Save your Back and Powerlift!

When it comes to back safety PowerLifting is not an Olympic sport. Dr. Michael Schaefer patented the PowerLift Technique which is designed to help one safely lift objects in order to protect the back from injury.

Back injuries can be debilitating, and improper lifting techniques can over time lead to lots of pain and discomfort. “Powerlift: Lifting Training that Works” explores why back lifting is bad and how to incorporate PowerLifting techniques to different types of situations, including lifting difficult objects such as tall loads, loads with no handles, and objects on low shelves.

Some of the lifts discussed include the wide stance PowerLift, the tipping load, the tripod lift and the golfer’s bend.

Check out OSHA’s fact sheet on back safety for details on the “nation’s number one workplace safety problem“.

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3 Responses to Save your Back and Powerlift!

  1. brandonlasage says:

    This wasn’t what I was looking for, but it is helpful. If one really wants to protect their spine, actual powerlifting correctly will help you build the core structures which support your body: Abs, spinal erectors, traps, lats, hips, glutes; they all play a role.

    • Rachel says:

      You must have been looking for information on powerlifting, as a strength sport. You make a good point about building the structures to support heavy lifting. Beyond not having the muscle to lift, people often use improper body mechanics and create debilitating back injuries from poor lifting movements. All of our courses on back safety help people focus on the way they lift object, whether at work or at home. Glad you were able to gain something from this!

      • brandonlasage says:

        Yes, most definitely. I regularly see a chiropractor for spinal adjustments. For the longest time I didn’t realize how poor my posture and body mechanics had become. I didn’t realize that though I had the muscle strength, it was uneven and causing instability issues, thus over-compensation caused a wide array of issues.

        Too many people lift with their back and knees for too long not realizing how terrible it for you overall!

        Thanks
        ~Brandon!

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