Responding to Confined Space Emergencies

The 33 Chilean miners who  were trapped over 2,000 feet underground for over two months in 2010 (http://www.usatoday.com)  is an amazing story that ended in triumph. The accomplishment can partly be attributed to a successful confined space emergency response.

The “Confined Space Emergency” video training series was created to prevent avoidable confined space injuries and deaths.  Confined Space Emergency: Understanding Confined Spaces (Program 1) explains what is considered a confined space, associated hazards, types of confined spaces, permits and rules for safe entry.

The second part of this series is Confined Space Emergency: Confined Space & the Emergency Responder (Program 2)  looks at the critical role of the first responder. The first responder must know and strictly adhere to all established rules and guidelines and must keep the area safe during rescue preparation and execution.

Part three Confined Space Emergency: Confined Space Technical Rescue (Program 3) is directed at the technical rescuer. The technical rescuer is tasked with having a rescue plan in place for all possible types of rescues that may arise; they must regularly practice rescue procedures under varied hazards, must don proper personal protective equipment (PPE) and stay focused on established procedures.

The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) has established standards for confined space entry in order to help prevent accidents. Properly training response workers can help achieve successful outcomes should a confined space emergency occur.

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2 Responses to Responding to Confined Space Emergencies

  1. Confined Space Rescue requires vast experience and training.

    • Rachel says:

      Very true, training is critical. Unfortunately a lot of deaths occur when individuals without proper training attempt a rescue. Thanks for reading!

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