A new way to look at employee engagement and productivity

How can training and development change employee engagement?

How can training and development change employee engagement?

Employee engagement is an important facet of worker productivity and happiness. Due to recent research indicating the drop in engagement worldwide, many industries are searching for ways to boost engagement in their workplaces.

As tips, trends and changes emerge under the guise of engagement, an important part seems to be missing — the employees themselves. Although engagement is contingent on many different factors, such as communication practices, benefits and management teams, workers themselves can also have an effect.

According to a recent Gallup Poll, engagement should also be looked at in relation to the specific employee. This can be achieved through:

  • Defining engagement: Business leaders and employees often know where their engagement is strong and where it may be lacking. Having a clear definition of engagement, based on what works best for your particular workforce, is an important aspect to keep in mind.
  • Developing an engagement plan: Having a plan to follow is a great way to ensure everyone’s needs are met. If the engagement in your business seems to be lacking, target what exactly isn’t working, what needs to be done, and outline how it can be accomplished.
  • Holding employees accountable: If an employee has lost their spark, be sure everything is being done to gain it back. Be sure to also let the employee know that their engagement begins with them and the effort they are willing to commit.
  • Viewing engagement as a choice: Participation, willingness and collaboration should be viewed as a choice, in that employees must choose to engage themselves. To make this choice, management must ensure engagement practices are reachable in the first place.

Learn more about employee development practices and other training information on our website. Engage employees with Mastery’s easy to use e-learning courses today.

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